Society Page

While researching the designer label on an evening gown I picked up this weekend for Tiddleywink Vintage, I came across the “society” page of The Pittsburgh Press, November 15, 1947. I hope you like these snippets. Click ’em to see ’em larger.

Dolores (Carr) Rothrauff, 1947
Bunnye (Wedner) Kramer, 1947
Dorothy (Parrish) Briney, 1947
Social Situations, 1947
Juke Box Wail, 1947
Long Skirts, 1947

Other News:

A day in Leadville, CO
  • The fella and I, along with his younger sister and their parents, went up to Leadville (Colo.) for a day trip over the weekend for the parents’ 40th anniversary. The dad lived in Leadville until 1958, so it was a trip jam-packed with anecdotes and information that really made for an interesting day. We saw the hospital where dad was born (now condos) as well as the tar-paper house where his mother was born in 1906. We went past the rectory where her father first stopped—ready to receive his last rites—when he arrived in Leadville, because he was sure that his arid-climate nosebleed was in fact a sign of the high-altitude-induced brain hemorrhage that would soon cause his death. 🙂 An antiques shop in Leadville is where I found the aforementioned gown, but seeing as it’s not exactly a fancy-dress town, I’m not sure if it ever saw a dance floor locally. Perhaps it caught a performance or two at the Tabor Opera House before being packed away for many years.
  • Also acquired: my first piece (no, really!) of Fire-King Jadite ovenware! I’ve long been on the hunt for a single, affordable, useful piece. Yes, I could use a mug, but I have this whole matchy-matchy thing going and I likely wouldn’t. I once found a solo fridgie dish-and-lid for a reasonable price, but it was chipped. Then lo, what do I spy in the corner of the antiques store but what appears to be a smallishy loaf baker which is not only marked a reasonable $22 but also conveniently on sale for 20% off! Once I got it home I learned that it’s actually a fridgie dish but with the less common (?) “Colonial” style rim, and it should have a clear lid. This set came with the same clear, handle-less lids used on the Gay Fad painted series. Those seem more easily found online, so I may buy myself a Gay Fad set just to steal the lid. ANYway…pale green bliss!
  • The cherry-pie-that-didn’t-turn-out, I have decided, will make a delicious addition to a batch of homemade ice cream. Mmmm, ice cream!
  • The wardrobe dep’t. for “Vegas” placed another order! Woo!
  • Um, probably other stuff! Zippity doo-dah!

Very happy to be working this week on a project for Cooper House, who are not only pretty darn fab designers (and coders), but also wonderful friends. However, between that and a client meeting I have on Wednesday and a high-maintenance-pet-sitting gig I have going all this week: go away. I’m busy. I’ll be blogging (I hope!) but you have a reprieve from the baking/canning/cooking posts this week. Ta for now!

The Tale of the Curious Curio

Curio ad, scanned from a 1959 periodical

Okay, so it’s not so much of a tale, actually. Unless you’ve “heard strange tales about mysterious looking Hands.” I came across this small ad in the margin of one of my old magazines (this one from 1959) and I’m intrigued by this…thing. The cost of $3.48 wasn’t exactly small change back then: according to my handy inflation calculator, that’s the buying power of a little more than $27 today. But hey, it does come in its own lambskin bag! I’m just as curious about the semi-random capitalization throughout the ad as I am about the curio. The only other mention I can find online of the P. S. Bureau Co. (not the U.K. utility company) is another ad, this time for a Perpetual Prayer Cross.

I can’t tell you much about this curious curio, but if I ever run across one, I’m gluing a pinback to it and wearing it as a “strange” brooch!

VICE QUEENS: EXPOSED!

’member the other day when I said I’d picked up some olde periodicals over the weekend? Truth. I was planning to scan in some old ads, for either their entertainment value or their classic beauty, BUT…

The National Police Gazette has, scattered among its pages of (yawn) boxing statistics, PURE PULP GENIUS. I can’t NOT share these images with you. So here we go (and as usual, clicking on an image will show you the larger version):

New York’s Chief Magistrate Murtagh EXPOSES—
DARK SECRETS of the VICE QUEENS

Erica Steele, attractive redhead, was described by police as a “madam.” —The National Police Gazette, Jan 1959 / from “Cast the First Stone,” by John M. Murtagh and Sara Harris, ©1957
Nancy Hawkins, shown here modeling, was one of the girls questioned in New York’s famed Jelke vice case. —The National Police Gazette, Jan 1959 / from “Cast the First Stone,” by John M. Murtagh and Sara Harris, ©1957
Pat Ward, was a chief witness in the trial of Mickey Jelke on vice charges. At right is address book in which Pat kept names of her “friends.” —The National Police Gazette, Jan 1959 / from “Cast the First Stone,” by John M. Murtagh and Sara Harris, ©1957
Model Jerri Maxwell, testifying in a vice trial, admitted having relations with seven men…The men in question, she said, paid her from $20 to $100. —The National Police Gazette, Jan 1959 / from “Cast the First Stone,” by John M. Murtagh and Sara Harris, ©1957

Aren’t they just dripping with intrigue? The book these are all taken from is out of copyright (I checked) so I could share the accompanying article, but these “shamed women” are the best bits anyway.

On a side note: Facebook logged me out while I was posting yesterday, and won’t let me log back in until I give them my cell phone number. Which I won’t do (nor will I go out of my way to get a temporary, “disposable” number just to feed their hunger for personal information), so the Facebook page and all related communication is in a coma until further notice. You can still find me here, as well as on Instagram and Twitter (my username for both is @ampersandwich). And Pinterest, too!